My Experience with an Animal Communicator Pt II

A few weeks ago, I had a discussion with an animal communicator, Anise Silvernail, see Part I. At the time of the call, I was just beginning the process of purchasing Leo, a horse I’d been riding for a year and half, and wanted to tread lightly around the purchase process so saved this post until it was official!

I listed a few of the questions I asked below, but our conversation flowed a bit more than a question and answer session would, regardless I still included the basic idea of the question, her (Anise’s)/his (Leo’s) response and my reaction to what was communicated.


Q: What makes him happiest?

A: Leo says he needs regular work and interaction and brain stimulation. Not just going around and bopping around doing the same thing every day. He wants to work and think and he says he’s very smart and if he’s taught something he GETS IT. He needs little obstacle courses and work with poles and cones and he can be a little obstinate, but he really just likes to learn new things.

He says you need to relax more in your upper body. He likes being someone’s somebody. He felt like a waste of space before. He’s not aloof, but he’s nervous to displease or dissatisfy. He has a fear of rejection.

If you buy him and stop coming out, he would be so sad. He hates having to worry if you’re going to show up. Assure him you'll be coming back, like tell him out loud when you’ll see him next.

He’s kind of like a hound dog, very go along to get along as is happy to do whatever you want to.

R: This is pretty spot on. Leo is not a grumpy horse in his stall, but you can tell when he gets bored! Like dude has annihilated stall doors in his past. Not angrily, not looking to wreak havoc, but he has just taken out a stall door because he felt like going for a graze. He is also very smart, is always looking for patterns in our riding, hoping he can be one step ahead of my instruction. I know he bonds to people easily and has been passed over for a permanent home a few times and it definitely took him some time to accept me as someone who would keep showing up. I also do struggle a lot with not following with my hands.


Q: [On on the topic of not seeing him as much] There are days he has other lessons, so I don’t go out because I don’t want to overwork him.

A: He doesn’t mind if he has another lesson, he still wants to see me. Just go out and groom him, spend time in his stall. He feels like you’re always on the clock. He says that you’re a little intense, very high anxiety and stressed and hurrying through, but he can tell that you naturally fall into a groove with him and just being at the barn and once you start riding, like all is right in the world. He can tell the barn is your happy place.

R: I do hate to go out when I feel like I’ll be rushed or trying to hurry and get ready and hurry and go home. And it’s so true that when I arrive at the barn most days, especially after work, I feel like the embodiment of nervous energy but feel completely at peace once I’m a few minutes into my ride.


Q: Would he like to be in a pasture? Would he want to move barns?

A: He say he wouldn’t mind moving barns, but doesn’t want to bounce all over. He doesn’t like constantly having new people taking care of him or wondering if he’ll be fed on time. He would not like being in a pasture with other horses, he does like having let down time to himself in a stall. He’s sort of like the outgoing person at a dinner party who feels pressure to entertain and always have an exciting story to tell but is exhausted by the effort and needs time to decompress.

R: This really surprised me. Leo has always struck me as the friendliest horse, he’s always curious with his neighbors in his stall and in the cross ties, but I can see how he would like his decompression time. He isn’t the most patient soul and has recently stopped chilling in his walk out since getting new neighbors he doesn’t quite like as much, kinda sad. But I am glad he enjoys his stall and isn’t like dyyyying to be in a pasture, though I do think he’ll end up in one as it should improve his creakiness.


Q: Does his tummy ever hurt? Ulcers, etc.?

A: His stomach doesn’t hurt, its more his lower back and into his ribcage is tight. He needs to strengthen his back. He drops his belly going around, and that’s why he has that tenderness.

R: He loves to bee bop around lazily, just super inverted and ugly. We’ve recently been working on belly lifts and hopefully that along with attentive riding will improve things. He’s already improved with the touchiness surrounding his flank/loin.


Q: Is he sore in his neck or legs? Or anywhere? How’s my saddle fit?

A: His legs are okay, normal. I would recommend neck stretches, like a carrot stretch. His neck feels very tight, tight down into his withers. Your saddle fit is okay, the half pad needs work. Its sort of interfering and feels like it moves too much as one piece if that makes sense.

R: This is not surprising AT ALL. His neck has become super stiff in the past two months, especially to the left! A chiro adjustment is at the top of my wishlist for him, but we have been working on the carrot stretches as well.


Q: What’s his favorite thing to do? Trail ride? Jump? Show? Graze?

A: He loves to just have fun times, run around and play tag with him. I know they say it creates nippy horses but he loves when you hide treats in your pockets and have him find them. Says if you play with him in a field he won’t kick you or hurt you, just likes to play.

R: This was so sweet to hear! Maybe it’s all horses, but Leo seems to especially love searching my pocket for treats. Pretty cute, it’s a very common activity for us.


Q: Favorite treat?

A: Favorite treat is apples, like the yellow golden apples. The red ones can taste like nothing and the green ones are too sharp.

R: Can confirm, he looooves these apples. Maybe he’s reacting the way any horse would react to a delicious apple, but definitely one of his favorite treats!


Q: What do I do that he doesn’t like?

A: He said he doesn’t like: everyyyything you do, said jokingly. He says he’s very grateful that he has you in his life.

But sometimes when we are trying something, you assume he knows something and he needs to work up to it. Just because he’s done something before with another rider, doesn’t mean he’ll understand when you ask him. He doesn’t understand how far we are scooping.

You need to be clear with your outside aids, because he doesn’t understand what you’re asking.

You need to work on going slow and really praise when he does it well so he knows if he’s done it right.

R: He gave an example of a circle exercise we did the week before - spiraling in and out. I was so confused by what Anise was describing I couldn’t take notes. I was just like what the hell am I scooping? I don’t feed him?? I eventually understood. So true that I needed to be clear with my outside aids, to spiral out I was removing my outside leg pretty much completely and his should was just completely falling out of the circle!


Q: Can you tell me about his past? Where did he grow up? Has he had a happy life?

A: He does not want to talk about his old life at all. He’s done with it, it’s in the past, his old owner does not need to visit him. He went through some traumatic things and is very future focused. Animals are very much like children in that once they experience trauma, they choose to ignore it and not think about it. He’s happy today and that’s all he cares about.

R: Wasn’t expecting quite this response, but it somewhat fits what I’ve heard about his past. He was basically a Big Eq horse but couldn’t mentally keep up with the intense show schedule. After an accident with his owner, he lost a ton of trust and was put up for sale and [fortunately for me] never sold. His story is so sad, but I’d never have the chance to have such an incredible animal in my life otherwise.