HH Reviews: Equilab the App

 

I’ve been tracking my rides with the Equilab app for almost a year now. Why? I started because it was fun, but its also nice to see how my rating of my own performance and my horse’s performance ebbs and flows. The app also tracks things such as workout length, calorie burn and turn distribution, which is very useful since Leo has a favorite lead and it happens to be mine, too! How does it work? Your location is tracked by your phone, so yes, you have to wear your phone on you, and the app analyzes your location pinging to determine if you’re walking, trotting or cantering as well as recording your path.

The picture at right is a screenshot of the main screen of a completed workout. It measured the length of the workout with a breakdown of each gait, the distance traveled and the average speed.

You can also view your ride displayed as a colorful aerial view summary diagram (see screenshots above) or you can even display a satellite view (see screenshot at bottom). Walk is displayed as blue, trot as yellow and canter as pink.

The screenshot at right is from a hack I did the first night the temperature was over 90 degrees, in April of course. My goal for this ride was to have an easy hack with a good warm-up, but nothing too strenuous. Well, he was visibly sweaty all over his neck and shoulder by the time we had cantered a few times around the arena so we quit there. He still had plenty of energy so I rated his Performance as a 5/5.

Note: The Performance section, rides notes, surface (soft, medium, hard, mixed) and the type of ride (ie jumping, hacking, cardio, competition, etc.) are the only possible inputs. The rest of the statistics recorded are all generated from your GPS pings.

Once you click the down arrow under Details, it expands the window and you can see what details are displayed in the screenshots below.

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This is my personal favorite graph that displays the transitions and rest breaks that we took during this ride. And yes, we purposely took trot breaks!

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I’m not entirely sure how accurate the beat and stride graphs are, I assume a purchase product like Hylofit would be the most accurate if measuring stats like that are important to you.

However, I’m going to go ahead and believe the speed graph! I really love looking at this because I can see just how forward and energetic Leo was that night! His trot was super forward (even sans spurs!), and his canter very floaty and relaxed! Though I kind of thought we were galloping and apparently the average horses canter is anywhere from 10 to 17 miles per hour, so #WESLOW.

I know Leo has a longer stride than most horses and if I recall correctly, most courses are set at a 12 foot stride? He was extra extend-y that night so there’s no way that 9.9 ft is correct. I’m curious if there’s a way to calibrate it to the correct distance like you had to way back in the day with the Nike+ shoe tracker?

Okay so maybe that’s not the most useful part of the app, but it does have one last really awesome feature! You enable SAFETY TRACKING so that your “safety contacts” can following you along on your ride, and know when you’ve returned. I’m definitely going to be utilizing this more and having my husband install Equilab so he knows when I’m safe and done riding.

I think the best use for this app is being able to track your ratios of gaits. When I first started using this for my rides outside of lessons, I found it felt like my warm-ups were super long and I barely got to canter. This isn’t to go into theories of how long you need to warm up or if you need to trot more than you canter, or whatever, but however I felt was not reflected by the app. My walk warm-ups were way too short and I was working at the canter much too long. The app has helped me regulate my warm-up and cool down and also ensure I’m cutting the work-out short.

Diagram of our ride discussed above, as you can see, lots of direction changes and transitions.

Diagram of our ride discussed above, as you can see, lots of direction changes and transitions.

Aerial view diagram as a plain or satellite background.

Aerial view diagram as a plain or satellite background.